#171757  by Gr8fulCadi
 
Congrats! The Timmy was designed to get a transparent, amp-like overdrive at lesser volumes. Is it the same as a Twin on 7? Nope. But nothing is, other than a Twin on 7. Enjoy!
 #171770  by milobender
 
Get a used Quilter Mach II head, a thick air pedal, and a couple of JBL k or d 120s (I like one of each) and you will be one HAPPY CAMPER!

Forgot to mention, not only does this give you killer home volume stuff, but you can change the settings and play practically anywhere out, 200 watts, but then if you're pushing it, you'd need E120s... medium clubs to bedroom it's stellar
 #171771  by TI4-1009
 
8-6-71 for me wrote: Sun Sep 26, 2021 11:28 am
As a practical matter a Fender Champ with a JBL D-208 speaker is the solution. Instantly recognizable JBL tone and tube warmth and some grit at like "4" from a 6 watt amp.
:musicsmile:
 #171772  by Chocol8
 
Just listened to some 72 shows while on a long drive (4/26 Lovelight…OMFG!!! I forgot how good that was! :o ) and my thought is that you are hearing the power tubes starting to distort here. This is the end of the era where he uses the full Twin Reverbs before they went to the pre-amp out and the original pre-Budman MacIntosh’s around late 72, early 73. IMHO Jerry’s tone trended down from here, although the tb500 era tones are pretty good too, and I think it’s because he lost the power section saturation when they went to the pre-amp outs.

You won’t get this sound from dirt pedals or hitting pre-amp triode tubes hard. The best way to get this sound is going to be to really drive a pair or quad of 6L6’s and then figure out how to tame the volume.

I think a reactive load attenuator or load box is the way to go here. Push the amp, get the tubes cookin’ and then absorb the excessive (for home) power in the load box and re-amp it with a clean SS amp into one or more JBL’s. The chain will be somewhat similar to the popular pre-amp setups and Jerry’s post 72 rigs, but when you include the phase inverter, power tubes and output transformer in the chain the sound is different, more saturated and less clean than later Jerry. That setup will get you Europe 72 with a Strat and the late 60’s through 71 tones (mostly) with Les Pauls with p90’s or an SG with hums. Turn down to keep it clean and you will be pretty close to the later rig tones as well.
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 #171777  by Gr8fulCadi
 
I have a Fryette PS2 which I recommended above, does a 2 ohm load. But even with that, a huge equation is still missing from the 72’ tone…stressing out the JBL’s at insanely loud volumes. You don’t get that with an attenuator, reactive load etc. at bedroom volume.
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 #171779  by Phrygian
 
Gr8fulCadi wrote: Mon Oct 04, 2021 3:11 pm I have a Fryette PS2 which I recommended above, does a 2 ohm load. But even with that, a huge equation is still missing from the 72’ tone…stressing out the JBL’s at insanely loud volumes. You don’t get that with an attenuator, reactive load etc. at bedroom volume.
Agreed. Another missing element from the equation is that I am not Jerry Garcia. My aim is to get a sound close enough to have some fun playing along with the recordings, trying to improve my own playing, and learning (stealing) some licks.
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 #171784  by Chocol8
 
Gr8fulCadi wrote: Mon Oct 04, 2021 3:11 pm But even with that, a huge equation is still missing from the 72’ tone…stressing out the JBL’s at insanely loud volumes.
I don’t think the JBL’s were stressed out in 1972. By that time Jerry would have been using either cloth surround D120F’s or early K120’s. Either one has a power handling or around 100-150 watts continuous depending on frequency, and with the bass turned to 0, they would be at the upper end of the range. This was the pre-Mac era, so the Twin Reverbs (several!) were putting out about 80 watts to a pair of speakers or about 40 watts each. If they were also using extension cabs, it would have been more like 20 watts each. Either way, the speakers were loafing along and not adding significant compression or distortion.

The two things you will be missing with any low volume solution are the way human ears react to loud volumes, and the way the guitar reacts to loud stage volume. You can partially correct for the fist one with a Fletcher-Munson curve, but there is nothing that substitutes for the sound hitting the guitar and strings.
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