Chat about Equipment Info
 #103442  by Rusty the Scoob
 Thu Sep 15, 2011 7:07 am
SarnoMusicSolutions wrote:Telefunken is making a few shapes. They have the exact Jerry pick clone too. I think Edwin has the Phil Lesh shaped triangle one, yes/no?

Brad
Yep, he does. It's a nice pick, but strange. 1.6mm too, a little thinner than the Jerry version. I can see why Mike Gordon likes the triangle design, he's got 3 chances to get a picking edge on the string instead of one.

Cool, so I'll stop hoarding my Adamases like they're the last ones on earth then. :lol: It's hard to trust Ebay these days but I can see why it wouldn't make sense for them to set up their own storefront just to sell picks.
 #103494  by zambiland
 Thu Sep 15, 2011 11:45 pm
jackr wrote:That is interesting. I know the CEO of Telefunken. I sold him a Resurrection bolt a while back. He's got a great guitar collection. Real nice guy. He said he would hook me up with mics if I ever needed but never mentioned the pics.
Forget the picks, go for a mic! I have 5 of the M80s for my location recording business and they are wonderful. Of course, it only goes up and up and up from there. Their $12k tube mics sound stunning. So, run, don't walk and get a mic or 7!

Edwin
PS Since switching over to the big 1.5mm picks, I have a bunch of the Adamas graphites lying around if anyone wants some at fair market prices, whatever that might be right now.
 #103512  by HeadSpace
 Fri Sep 16, 2011 8:16 am
SarnoMusicSolutions wrote:Why bother Dunlop anymore? I believe that Telefunken is now gladly making plenty of these Jerry picks for us all.

B
Well, here's the thing: I don't know for sure, obviously, but it strikes me as possible--and perhaps even likely--that the Telefunken picks are in fact Dunlop-manufactured and may well have been a one-off run for promotional purposes, which seems to be how they came into being--it appears they were used as a fun "throw-in" with mics and other purchases. This suggests they may not be around forever and there may not be any more coming.

In short, I doubt that Telefunken manufactures its own graphite/delrin-blend picks. In fact, I strongly suspect that there's only one company that has made such picks. And that compay isn't planning to make any more, they say. So I'd be stocking up on Telefunkens, too, just to be safe, rather than assume there's a new endless supply now.

Of course I could be wrong about any of this--just my analysis based on the available facts.
 #103514  by JonnyBoy
 Fri Sep 16, 2011 8:28 am
That is an interesting theory, and who knows, but those Tele picks were available while the Adamas picks were available too, a few runs before they stopped selling them at least. I would assume they are similar, but again more money. I know there is an off site factory making the graphite mixture, and Dunlop was working with them. Cost wise, they are actually 2x the price,,, There is something about using the originals too, maybe just mojo? I am not against a well made copy though. If they improve the tone in its own right, much like Brad did with his SMS v's a fender amp, then I am happy. Even if it is just as good, but a little different...happy. I am easy to please.
 #103555  by SarnoMusicSolutions
 Sat Sep 17, 2011 7:21 am
The Telefunken picks are indeed made by themselves and NOT Dunlop. It seems that the whole thing is connected to and inspired by Phish since Trey also happens to be a user of the 2mm Adamas "Jerry" pick and has been since the '80s. The Dunlop supply had become very inconsistent and threats of ending production pushed the move. Mike Gordon also likes the triangular shape like Edwin also likes to use, and I think that shape is one that Lesh liked or likes to use. So the guys with Telefunken have actually been making these clones with the exact same and correct material. Now Trey has a lifetime supply of the 2mm Adamas clone pick, and Mike has gobs of his favorite.

Even the Dunlop "Adamas" isn't the original, although theirs was the most popular version. They used to originally be made by Adamas (aka: Ovation) and then at some point Dunlop bought the design and material. Remember that Adamas/Ovation was big into graphite and composite synthetic guitar materials. So they made a pick along those lines. At some point Jerry discovered it and preferred it to is previous favorite, the Fender Extra Heavy.

I used to buy the original Adamas picks in the mid-late '80s. They were sold 3 to a pack, plastic sealed onto a flat red card the size of a string pack with big white "Adamas" graphics on it. It would hang on the wall like guitar strings. They were expensive then, but can't remember exactly how much. When I worked at a guitar store in the late '80s, it seems like somewhere around '88 they appeared in the distributor's catalog as a new Dunlop-made product and I never saw the red Adamas packaging again. The only difference I saw seemed to be that when Dunlop cloned them, the detail of the molding, the artwork and "Adamas" on the pick wasn't molded quite as perfectly as the true original Adamas. Other than that, I believe the black goo that they used for the picks has never changed. Thru the '90s and still I notice that some batches of Dunlops will appear different from other batches. Some are dull and smooth, others are shiny and swirly, like the goo wasn't blended up completely. But all in all, they seem to have pretty much the same net effect as a pick. Especially after you've played them for a while and the strings wear a new surface where contact is made.


B
 #103616  by SarnoMusicSolutions
 Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:02 pm
And regarding using this pick, I still find it very challenging. I have to use it all the time and even when I pick up the guitar, it takes a good 20 minutes to even get my right hand in the zone. There's no forgiveness with this pick. You really have to have just the right touch, and if you pick too hard with it, which is the tendency for most, the tone is bad. Hard picking with this pick makes for a quick snap and then a lifeless and dull note. But the light touch, just gently nudging the string into vibration, is full of life and rich, clear, sparkly tone. Nothing like being in the zone with this pick where the right hand is just gliding across the strings. But at first, it's pretty clunky for me. Anyone else find this to be true??


Brad
 #103617  by Emoto
 Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:18 pm
SarnoMusicSolutions wrote:And regarding using this pick, I still find it very challenging. I have to use it all the time and even when I pick up the guitar, it takes a good 20 minutes to even get my right hand in the zone. There's no forgiveness with this pick. You really have to have just the right touch, and if you pick too hard with it, which is the tendency for most, the tone is bad. Hard picking with this pick makes for a quick snap and then a lifeless and dull note. But the light touch, just gently nudging the string into vibration, is full of life and rich, clear, sparkly tone. Nothing like being in the zone with this pick where the right hand is just gliding across the strings. But at first, it's pretty clunky for me. Anyone else find this to be true??


Brad
Yeah. I used to use picks that flexed the right amount to give me the attack I wanted. Now, with the rigid Adamas pick, all of that attack control is in my hand and wrist, so it is more of a challenge.