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Musical Theory Abound!!!
 #69272  by Stevo123
 Sun Nov 29, 2009 2:41 pm
This is just a start but I've noticed some general principles in "Bob playing" and thought it would be a good idea to compile a list. If anyone has others or has corrections to these please add on!

1. Focus on root-fifth combinations with particular focus on the fifths.
2. Tend to dwell in the upper register.
3. Favor voicings with fifth intervals (or in other words, voicings going diagonally down the neck of the guitar). Fifth intervals are very consonant and blend well.
4. Stick to two or three notes in a chord in most cases. When using three, tend to stay away from use of a 1-3-5 triad. The third note may be an octave of the root or fifth, or in certain cases an extension note like a 7 or 9.
5. Hold common tones over chord changes. Favor moving the lower notes over a sustained higher note. The idea is to make smooth transitions and hide the fact that a chord change has even occurred.
6. Tend to stay off thirds, especially when using 3-note chords. Thirds stick out and tend to make chords too dense. Allow the melody, lead instrument, or piano to reveal tonalities.
7. Guideline 6 may need to be ignored completely depending on the song and what the other instruments are doing.
8. Thirds sound good when resolving from a suspended fourth or on a IV-I progression.
9. Your volume should be set so you should not be heard if you play on a beat where several other instruments are also playing. Be heard and enhance the band sound by filling in spaces where no one else is playing. Stay away from beat 1.
10. Utilize syncopation and play on "and" beats.
11. During a lead guitar player’s solo, key into the solo and accent what he is doing rhythmically and harmonically. Follow down tangents. Accent the notes he is playing.
 #69293  by NashvilleMike
 Mon Nov 30, 2009 6:34 am
12. When the song slows down at the end start screaming alot.
13. Stand straight up at the microphone and spit when singing.
14. Wear short shorts when its hot out.
15. Pink guitars and short shorts just go together.
16. Grow a crazy looking 1880's gold prospector beard and mustache.
17. Play with feeling, dexterity and an amazing sense of relevant tonality.
 #69299  by strumminsix
 Mon Nov 30, 2009 8:14 am
Seems kinda contradictory and wrong in spots. It comes down the this for me:

1. Chord voicing
2. Playing single notes around the chord
3. Timing
4. Complimentary and transitional chords

The 1+5 focus is not at all what Bobby does normally. He is very careful with his voicings and part of it has him 5+1 inversions or maybe 5+3 or 3+5 or 5+1+3...

Ignoring the 3rd is less than optimal and something I'd advocate against. Typically the bass OWNS the 1st and 5th so the 3rd is something that is essential. In fact Bobby plays alot off 3rd + 5ths and dancing hammer/pulls with the 4th...
 #69319  by Stevo123
 Mon Nov 30, 2009 11:49 am
It's just a tendency, not a hard and fast rule, but I very, very rarely hear bob play a third, except in passing or as part of a riff. Thirds are hard to handle on electric guitar as full triads are often too weighty and are better left to the keyboard player. Thirds tend to show up in the melody/lead guitar a lot so it's often best to leave them alone on rhythm guitar. I've noticed bob's playing tends to revolve mostly around fifths. I have noticed, however, that he is much more likely to play a third of a minor chord rather than a major.
 #69323  by Rusty the Scoob
 Mon Nov 30, 2009 12:21 pm
I tend to play a LOT of 3rds on bass when I'm Phil, especially major ones. It's a great note for color, since it both wants to go up or down and also sounds very cool if you hang on it. Under minor chords I'll usually hit it to establish the tonality if it's important (like in Cassidy or the bridge to Black Peter) but not linger since it really doesn't cause the same motion. So the above post makes a lot of sense.
 #69330  by Pete B.
 Mon Nov 30, 2009 1:15 pm
I would add...
Hammer-on riffs using both single and multiple strings.
String Bends that encompass two or three strings.
Partial chords up the neck with open strings ringing.
Dissonant chord shapes that also incorporate partial chords with open strings ringing.
Extensive use of the CAGED method, heavy on playing out of the C-shape.
 #69334  by KCJones
 Mon Nov 30, 2009 1:53 pm
If you play and/or understand Piano, listen to and study McCoy Tyner and apply to guitar. Bob copped much of his techniques/style from him.

This Trane/Tyner sounds like Bob and Jerry interplay for sure. Note McCoy's left hand, that's Bob all the way.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTrb4iOi ... r_embedded


sounds like a Great new album:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j966AGrG ... r_embedded
 #69363  by old man down
 Tue Dec 01, 2009 8:17 am
Slide up whole barre chords from the fret just below to add punch and dynamics. (think the opening chords from Sugar Mag)
By doing this you can slip by the count of 1 as you will be mid-slide when that beat occurs.
 #69503  by Pete B.
 Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:13 am
Checkin' out 12/10 shows (my B-day is 12/10) and here Bobby does his stuff all over the place on the jams throughout this show (Playin', Truckin>Jam, Other One, etc...):
http://www.archive.org/details/gd72-12- ... sbeok.shnf

Also dig Jer's chord solo on Truckin' starting ~4:55.
Jer's wha-wha freak out at ~14min of Other One!
 #74859  by jahozer
 Wed Feb 24, 2010 8:22 pm
KCJones wrote:If you play and/or understand Piano, listen to and study McCoy Tyner and apply to guitar. Bob copped much of his techniques/style from him.

This Trane/Tyner sounds like Bob and Jerry interplay for sure. Note McCoy's left hand, that's Bob all the way.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTrb4iOi ... r_embedded


sounds like a Great new album:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j966AGrG ... r_embedded
yeah, I definitely hear Jerry and Bobby in that piano solo!
 #78682  by seamones
 Mon Apr 26, 2010 2:13 pm
KCJones wrote:If you play and/or understand Piano, listen to and study McCoy Tyner and apply to guitar. Bob copped much of his techniques/style from him.

This Trane/Tyner sounds like Bob and Jerry interplay for sure. Note McCoy's left hand, that's Bob all the way.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTrb4iOi ... r_embedded

d
Great video, thanks for posting.