rukind.com

Grateful Dead Music Forum

A place to talk about the music of the Grateful Dead 

 #120199  by Jimaroe
 Fri Oct 26, 2012 3:43 pm
Howdy all:
I've been kicking around this thought in my head for some time and I'm very interested in hearing some takes from anybody interested in adding their two cents. I think one aspect of the GD, and Jerry in particular, that has appealed to me from day one was/is Jerry's inate ability to play interspersed with other musicians. Particulary, Jerry and Brent's call and response. This especially hit home after watching some of the videos that have been released/re-released of the late 80s, early 90 era. Jerry and Brent trading notes, almost like one knew where the other was going, it's just something that really sings to me about the music. I'm not a professional musician, and my first shows were early nineties, basically in the rafters, so I was never really close enough to stage to see this play out with my eyes until I obtained the vids, but my ears always kinda told me the story on it. Sorry if this sounds corny/irrelevant or I'm not using the correct term call/response, call/answer, but I'd love to hear from some of the musicians, and common folk like me, chime in on it. :smile:
 #120200  by caspersvapors
 Fri Oct 26, 2012 3:59 pm
I think the two of them really dug each others playing. Jerry and Bobby have a lot of great call and response moments as well

to give you another example pre-brent of some call and response - check out Truckin from 11/6/77. hot like fiya
 #120202  by Jimaroe
 Fri Oct 26, 2012 4:12 pm
caspersvapors wrote:I think the two of them really dug each others playing. Jerry and Bobby have a lot of great call and response moments as well

to give you another example pre-brent of some call and response - check out Truckin from 11/6/77. hot like fiya
Yes. I read a quote somewhere that Bobby said, something to the effect that he knew where Jerry was going, and would be there with a little surprise for him. Wish I could find the exact quote, cool nonetheless. Ill check that Truckin out. Thanks
 #120206  by NorthboundRain
 Fri Oct 26, 2012 4:47 pm
I've always thought that the interplay between different band members really defines the sound and style of different eras. In the 60's most of the improv seems driven by Jerry and Phil playing off of each other (when the whole band wasn't backing up or reacting to Pigpen). In the early 70's Bob's style developed to a point where he could start to interject ideas into the mix and once Keith joined the band there was enough harmonic support for Phil to wander off and spend more time the the Phil Zone.

In the mid seventies I hear Jerry and Keith playing off of each other which to me is the core of the Jazz Years. As Keith started to fade in the late 70's Bill and Mickey's drumming drove Jerry and the band through the Disco years.

As mentioned before Jerry and Brent traded a lot of licks in in the 80's and early 90's and by the final years the band is still playing together but more as individuals and not as much of a gestalt ensemble. That's why I enjoyed seeing Hornsby sit in, his presence really seemed to bring the band together at times.
 #120541  by easytoslip
 Mon Nov 05, 2012 9:42 pm
thanks for the 77 and 93 suggestions, giving a listen now. got to hear some great conversing back and forth last night between Max Creek's Murawski (on the Languedoc) and Jeff Pevar. Killer chops, good times right there.
 #120544  by zambiland
 Mon Nov 05, 2012 10:35 pm
I think that call and response is a subset of music as conversation, which is what the Dead was all about. I keep trying to get this concept into the heads of all the musicians I play with, but it's hard to get across sometimes. It takes more listening than playing, even though from the outside it seems like it's all about the playing. Same thing in the jazz world.