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Grateful Dead Music Forum

A place to talk about the music of the Grateful Dead 

 #112512  by mraugustwest
 Thu Apr 12, 2012 4:42 pm
also for a 1969 dead vs 2012 white jeans:

white levis: sound like it could be done by one dude over-dubbing track after track himself. they are tight, but no dead. i didn't catch anything original/inventive/unique. :?

the dead of 1969: sound in no way like a overdubbed tape and instead sound like individual musicians uniquely coming together to create their own music. spontaneous, talented and raw. :cool:
 #112514  by jackr
 Thu Apr 12, 2012 5:18 pm
gr8fullfred wrote:OK I will compare them to the Dead of 1969:

The Dead played Woodstock, White Denim did not!
That is too funny! :lol:
 #112752  by Stevo123
 Tue Apr 17, 2012 8:13 pm
It's hard to really compare anybody to GD, and here's why. What they actually accomplished, I feel, is the creation of a distinct, complete, and complex musical language, which for decades has been refined and become even richer. It is a language that lends itself strongly toward interaction and unique ornamentation. There are many groups putting out great original music, but a lot of them are still deeply rooted in more traditional musical languages (which I feel are relatively simpler languages).

There are only a handful of other groups that have really paved entirely new and distinct musical languages. When I think of other groups that have done that, I think of groups like the Beatles, Little Feat, Pink Floyd, etc. None that I know of have created one as rich and complete as the Dead, though. What newer groups have ventured into that territory? Possibly Umphrey's Mcgee to a certain extent? Would be interested to hear any other suggestions for newer groups that fit that type of criteria.
 #112754  by tcsned
 Tue Apr 17, 2012 8:37 pm
I don't think we'll know about these group's staying power or trajectory as they haven't had the history that the Dead, Beatles, Stones, Floyd, etc. In 1970, if someone said that the Grateful Dead would have had the growth, diversity, and impact that they achieved, they would have been called daft.

Not that these bands are spring chickens but none have them have come close to achieving the audience and impact yet, Phish is the only one who has come close to that.

Part of the problem is that the music business has changed. American culture has changed. The world has changed. It has changed since 1995 and changed dramatically since the late 60s.
 #112756  by Stevo123
 Tue Apr 17, 2012 8:54 pm
The "music business", as far what music gets mass exposure and radio play, etc, is obviously pretty terrible nowadays. There's still some really awesome and novel music being made aside from all of that, though. Every time I attend a festival I'm amazed at the unique and diverse musical things so many groups are doing. In that sense, I think the "underground" music scene seems strong. There are at least a couple venues in Atlanta I know of that host some really great and unique bands regularly.
 #112757  by tcsned
 Tue Apr 17, 2012 9:13 pm
Stevo123 wrote:The "music business", as far what music gets mass exposure and radio play, etc, is obviously pretty terrible nowadays. There's still some really awesome and novel music being made aside from all of that, though. Every time I attend a festival I'm amazed at the unique and diverse musical things so many groups are doing. In that sense, I think the "underground" music scene seems strong. There are at least a couple venues in Atlanta I know of that host some really great and unique bands regularly.
For sure, there's some great new music out they're every bit as talented, just hard to do what those bands of 30-40 years ago. Maybe that's a good thing.
 #112762  by strumminsix
 Wed Apr 18, 2012 5:54 am
To me the Dead was a great band their relationship with loyal fans and their journey together.

Phish had that to an extent.

This band may one day have that but I don't hear the musical reckless abandonment that a great jamband needs.
 #112764  by Tennessee Jedi
 Wed Apr 18, 2012 7:24 am
tcsned wrote:
Part of the problem is that the music business has changed. American culture has changed. The world has changed. It has changed since 1995 and changed dramatically since the late 60s.
+1
Aint no use Looking for familiar faces in an empty window pane
:D
 #112884  by NSP
 Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:46 am
mraugustwest wrote:so this begs the question, who is making really good original music right now? there is never going to be a replacement for the dead, but is there anyone out there making good, honest, sincere american music that has a quasi-similar feel for technical complexity, originality, spontaneity and the right mix of traditional influences and ever expanding audio landscapes???

i don't know if it exists, but i hope someone here might suggest a few. again, this is not saying who is the next, but instead where should we look now a days.
I'm sure all of the Chicago guys on the forum know about Mr Blotto. They play a ton of Dead, but their original music is absolutely fantastic. Mike and Paul Bolger write some really great songs, lyrically and musically. They've been one of my favorite bands for a long time. I'm certainly not saying they're the Dead of this generation, and I'd guess they would agree, but they're searching for the sound...and finding it. Tons of shows to be had on Archive, check em out.
 #112892  by wolftigerrosebud
 Fri Apr 20, 2012 1:26 pm
Have you guys tried looking at music that isn't in the American music tradition as far as instrumentation goes but is in it in terms of composition? It's still totally different. IMO the most similar modern group to the Grateful Dead is Animal Collective. They're not just the best at what they do -- they're the only ones who do what they do.

And they sound completely, utterly different. All the members of the band love the Dead's music, but they play NO Grateful Dead songs (with the exception of We Bid You Goodnight played on occasion in live shows in 2004), which, for me, is a huge plus.

It's music that's all about love. It's totally different. It's heavily influenced by psychedelics. They change the music live constantly and jam fearlessly. They change their sound constantly from album to album. They're exploring the possibilities of new instruments just like the Dead did with electric guitars in the 60s when they hadn't already been extensively explored. It's great stuff.

And the current Dead members must think it's alright, too, since the AC was the first group ever to get permission to use a Dead sample in their music.