singing?

Re: singing?

Postby JamminJommy » Mon Dec 20, 2010 3:25 pm

DenverEd wrote:FWIW. I find that if I sing really "breathy" it creates a really thick note. Generally, the note I am trying to hit will be somewhere in there. If I sing it non-breathy (not sure of the opposite), then it's much harder to hit the note and easier to sound flat or sharp.


I major in Music Education and Vocal Performance so... here's my two cents.

As a matter of fact "breathy" singing is actually harder on your voice. But pitch center and intonation is a mental thing. You have to listen to, think about, and practice it.

When you watch a person swing a baseball bat, your brain processes the image and attempts to create a "shadow" of that action. When you think about swinging a baseball bat, the brain performs the action of swinging the bat to the best of its ability without telling your arms and body to move. When you swing the bat, it remembers the feeling and compares it with your assumption for improvement.

So how does one sing in tune? They practice singing in tune. Easier said than done, but if you practice really listening to the melody in a song and thinking about it, things will get easier. Singing along with some one that has good pitch and/or tone will make a big difference. Its like learning from a good guitarist just by listening to them and watching tons of videos (not like any of us do that :roll: ). Once you feel you can hold a consistent melody, than you practice learning harmonies. It is one thing to learn just the harmony part and try to ignore/block out the melody or lead vocals, but its actually, believe it or not, easier to know that melody as well as the harmony. Hearing the relationship between the two helps.

I'm a firm believer that anyone can learn to sing at any age. An old dog only stops learning new tricks when he doesn't want to learn anymore. I would practice singing along with a lot of your favorite songs all the time. Then practice playing and singing along with them. Then just play and sing them by yourself, then along with your band (if that is your intent). Singing is a form of muscle memory just like anything else. It just takes tons of practice.

Peace,

Jommy
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Re: singing?

Postby tcsned » Mon Dec 20, 2010 4:54 pm

JamminJommy wrote:
DenverEd wrote:FWIW. I find that if I sing really "breathy" it creates a really thick note. Generally, the note I am trying to hit will be somewhere in there. If I sing it non-breathy (not sure of the opposite), then it's much harder to hit the note and easier to sound flat or sharp.


I major in Music Education and Vocal Performance so... here's my two cents.

As a matter of fact "breathy" singing is actually harder on your voice. But pitch center and intonation is a mental thing. You have to listen to, think about, and practice it.

When you watch a person swing a baseball bat, your brain processes the image and attempts to create a "shadow" of that action. When you think about swinging a baseball bat, the brain performs the action of swinging the bat to the best of its ability without telling your arms and body to move. When you swing the bat, it remembers the feeling and compares it with your assumption for improvement.

So how does one sing in tune? They practice singing in tune. Easier said than done, but if you practice really listening to the melody in a song and thinking about it, things will get easier. Singing along with some one that has good pitch and/or tone will make a big difference. Its like learning from a good guitarist just by listening to them and watching tons of videos (not like any of us do that :roll: ). Once you feel you can hold a consistent melody, than you practice learning harmonies. It is one thing to learn just the harmony part and try to ignore/block out the melody or lead vocals, but its actually, believe it or not, easier to know that melody as well as the harmony. Hearing the relationship between the two helps.

I'm a firm believer that anyone can learn to sing at any age. An old dog only stops learning new tricks when he doesn't want to learn anymore. I would practice singing along with a lot of your favorite songs all the time. Then practice playing and singing along with them. Then just play and sing them by yourself, then along with your band (if that is your intent). Singing is a form of muscle memory just like anything else. It just takes tons of practice.

Peace,

Jommy

good advice Jommy, I would also add that looking at sheet music of melodies while you're singing is a good idea too. You see a visual representation of the changes in pitch will make it easier to remember. Practice singing intervals is also a good idea.
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Re: singing?

Postby JonnyBoy » Mon Dec 20, 2010 5:39 pm

I know its cheating, but pitch correction is technology that has come a long way, it actually helps you see what pitch you are supposed to hit audibly, as you are trying to sing. I enjoy it most for practicing and doing acoustic performances. The harmony is awesome too. anyone looking to up your vocal should consider one, most pros are doing it anyway these days...
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Re: singing?

Postby JamminJommy » Mon Dec 20, 2010 11:37 pm

tcsned wrote:I would also add that looking at sheet music of melodies while you're singing is a good idea too. You see a visual representation of the changes in pitch will make it easier to remember. Practice singing intervals is also a good idea.


Absolutely on both counts!!!

JonnyBoy wrote:I know its cheating, but pitch correction is technology that has come a long way, it actually helps you see what pitch you are supposed to hit audibly, as you are trying to sing. I enjoy it most for practicing and doing acoustic performances. The harmony is awesome too. anyone looking to up your vocal should consider one, most pros are doing it anyway these days...


I'll be the first to admit that I use *light* pitch correction on my band's albums. To sound good with it, you still have to sing relatively in tune. It really helps tighten up the background vocals, though and that's the best place for its application (I auto our backing vox to death). Audiences are growing tired of hearing over-auto-tuned vocals. So definitely using it as a learning tool is great, though I don't know if it would work for everyone.

You still have to sing in tune live and man... even after years of lessons, its still hard!!

Peace,

Jommy
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