Jerry on Theory

Re: Jerry on Theory

Postby waldo041 » Tue Sep 10, 2013 8:59 am

For me this statement is what I have been striving and struggling to achieve.

On electric guitar, I deal with the whole neck as a harmonic medium. I don’t see it in patterns or groupings. All those have become continuous for me
.

~waldo
"Tone is in the instruments. Technique in the hands. Do what you will." ~ quote from some guy at the TGP forum
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Re: Jerry on Theory

Postby TI4-1009 » Tue Sep 10, 2013 5:20 pm

Agree. But if that's Step C, I'm not even to Step B yet.... :oops:
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Re: Jerry on Theory

Postby hippieguy1954 » Wed Sep 11, 2013 5:35 am

waldo041 wrote:For me this statement is what I have been striving and struggling to achieve.

On electric guitar, I deal with the whole neck as a harmonic medium. I don’t see it in patterns or groupings. All those have become continuous for me
.

~waldo


+1 Me too! I still make a mistake here and there, but that is exactly the thing to achieve.
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Re: Jerry on Theory

Postby Pete B. » Thu Sep 12, 2013 8:08 am

hippieguy1954 wrote:
waldo041 wrote:For me this statement is what I have been striving and struggling to achieve.

On electric guitar, I deal with the whole neck as a harmonic medium. I don’t see it in patterns or groupings. All those have become continuous for me
.

~waldo


+1 Me too! I still make a mistake here and there, but that is exactly the thing to achieve.


The issue becomes... the physical ability to execute.
6 strings x 12 frets = 72 possible notes between open position and fret 12.
An identical layout exists between frets 12-24.
There's alot of info that needs to be mentally assimilated that is not specific to any instrument. Learning the totality of Music Theory is not unlike learning a second language, maybe even one that uses different alphabetic characters (for example, there's no sharp/flat aug/dim maj/min letters in our alphabet).
I wonder how they teach Music Theory in countries that use different alphabets??? They wouldn't name the notes A-G, would they?
Music Theory is also very numeric and mathematical, an alpha/numeric language.
Jerry obviously had the knowledge, and the skill/ability to implement that knowledge on his chosen instrument.
Nice!
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Re: Jerry on Theory

Postby TI4-1009 » Thu Sep 12, 2013 8:36 am

- Pete B I wonder how they teach Music Theory in countries that use different alphabets??? They wouldn't name the notes A-G, would they?


Getting pretty deep, maybe Micky can chime in on this one? :lol:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_notation

India
Indian music, early 20th centuryThe Indian scholar and musical theorist Pingala (c. 200 BC), in his Chanda Sutra, used marks indicating long and short syllables to indicate meters in Sanskrit poetry.

In the notation of Indian rāga, a solfege-like system called sargam is used. As in Western solfege, there are names for the seven basic pitches of a major scale (Shadja, Rishabh, Gandhar, Madhyam, Pancham, Dhaivat and Nishad, usually shortened Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Dha Ni). The tonic of any scale is named Sa, and the dominant Pa. Sa is fixed in any scale, and Pa is fixed at a fifth above it (a Pythagorean fifth rather than an equal-tempered fifth). These two notes are known as achala swar ('fixed notes'). Each of the other five notes, Re, Ga, ma, Dha and Ni, can take a 'regular' (shuddha) pitch, which is equivalent to its pitch in a standard major scale (thus, shuddha Re, the second degree of the scale, is a whole-step higher than Sa), or an altered pitch, either a half-step above or half-step below the shuddha pitch. Re, Ga, Dha and Ni all have altered partners that are a half-step lower (Komal-"flat") (thus, komal Re is a half-step higher than Sa). Ma has an altered partner that is a half-step higher (teevra-"sharp") (thus, tivra Ma is an augmented fourth above Sa). Re, Ga, ma, Dha and Ni are called vikrut swar ('movable notes'). In the written system of Indian notation devised by Ravi Shankar, the pitches are represented by Western letters. Capital letters are used for the achala swar, and for the higher variety of all the vikrut swar. Lowercase letters are used for the lower variety of the vikrut swar.

Other systems exist for non-twelve-tone equal temperament and non-Western music, such as the Indian svar lippi.

China
Chinese Guqin notation, 1425The earliest known examples of text referring to music in China are inscriptions on musical instruments found in the Tomb of Marquis Yi of Zeng (d. 433 B.C.). Sets of 41 chimestones and 65 bells bore lengthy inscriptions concerning pitches, scales, and transposition. The bells still sound the pitches that their inscriptions refer to. Although no notated musical compositions were found, the inscriptions indicate that the system was sufficiently advanced to allow for musical notation. Two systems of pitch nomenclature existed, one for relative pitch and one for absolute pitch. For relative pitch, a solmization system was used.

The tablature of the guqin is unique and complex; the older form is composed of written words describing how to play a melody step-by-step using the plain language of the time, i.e. Descriptive Notation (Classical Chinese); the newer form, composed of bits of Chinese characters put together to indicate the method of play is called Prescriptive Notation. Rhythm is only vaguely indicated in terms of phrasing. Tablatures for the qin are collected in what is called qinpu.

The jianpu system of notation (probably an adaptation of a French Galin-Paris-Cheve system) had gained widespread acceptance by 1900. It uses a movable do system, with the numbers 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 standing for do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, si. Dots above or below a numeral indicate the octave of the note it represents. Key signatures, barlines, and time signatures are also employed. Many symbols from Western standard notation, such as bar lines, time signatures, accidentals, tie and slur, and the expression markings are also used. The number of dashes following a numeral represents the number of crotchets (quarter notes) by which the note extends. The number of underlines is analogous to the number of flags or beams on notes or rests in standard notation.
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