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3-note repeating lick?

PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2006 2:24 pm
by amyjared
Anyone know the little 3 note (I think it's 3 notes I hear) repeating lick that is played right after lines like:

Lord, they're setting us on fire.

or

And the band keeps playin' on.

I don't hear it everytime, but on several live shows I have, there's this distinct walk up that is played and I would love to learn it and put it in when we play the song. Thanks for any help!!

Re: 3-note repeating lick?

PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2006 3:02 pm
by strumminsix
amyjared wrote:Lord, they're setting us on fire.


Here's that lick:
A --6h7-9---5h6-7---4h5-6---3h4-5-----

amyjared wrote:And the band keeps playin' on.

Walk up to the A from the E:
B--5---7---8---9---
G--4---6---7---8---
D--6---8---9---10---

Then comes the chorus :

Pt I -- A, Ao, Ab0, A
Pt II - A6, Dm, Fm7, D#o7, D7 > Fm7, D7 > E
Pt III - A6, Dm, Fm7, D#o7, D D D, E E E

Each verse after the Chorus is in A, next vers E.

And "but the music never stopped" D E A, then E F# B, jam in B then back into E for the main into riff.

PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2006 3:04 pm
by amyjared
That's EXACTLY what I was looking for! Thanks much!!

PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2006 3:07 pm
by strumminsix
Glad to help. Hit refresh since I added more.

Here is one more, Bobby's intro:

a --------------7-5-4---3------
e -/up---0-3-0-----------------

PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2006 10:25 pm
by Billbbill
Another take on those deals

I kinda prefer when Jer would play E blues pentatonic for that fill instead of the chromatics, but here's a slightly different line.

D--7-8-9--6-7-8--5-6-7--4-5-6----

The next I alter slightly with just 2 notes from the E to the A

G-1-2-3-4---
D-2-4-5-6---

Into this lick while were here


E------------------------------5
B------8-------7-------6-------5------
G---9-9-9---8-8-8---7-7-7---6-6----
D--7-7---7-7-7---7-7-7---7-7-7-------


One note for the end jam. Adding E7 between the E and A in the E A C jam adds a nice flavor and you can clearly hear Jerry doing this at times when he'd rip up the chords at the end.